The Cobblestone Ridge landscaping consists of four areas: (1) a zeric bed with rock mulch at the center of the turnaround on Saddle Court, and (2) a grass park and zeric bed on the east side of Saddle Court, (3) a zeric bed with rock mulch at the intersection of Rana Road and Saddle Court, (4) a zeric bed with rock mulch located at the intersection of Rana Road and Butte Court. All the zeric beds have drip irrigation and fabric weed barrier underlying the rock mulch. The word “zeric” is used here to indicate plantings with lower water requirements. Following is a more detailed description of these areas, planting materials, irrigation, and maintenance issues. A maintenance calendar is provided at the end of this document to facilitate the scheduling of required maintenance.  More general information regarding irrigation water is also provided.


1.   THE CIRCLE BED (located in the middle of Saddle Court)

Description: This bed consists of Cottonwood (volunteer), Russian Sage, crabapples, roses, Apache Plume, buddleia, Rabbitbrush, spreading junipers, Cotoneaster, Golden Rain Tree, Forsythia . . .

Irrigation: The irrigation valve and filter is located on the southeast side of the bed. The computer controlling water to this area is on private property at 414 Saddle Court. The bed includes two drip zones, schedule to water for 1 hour, 1 time a week. Note that over-watering of zeric beds is more likely to kill these plantings than under-watering. There have been several instances where an unknown person has shut off the computer or closed the valves controlling watering for this bed, so monitor both of these regularly.

Maintenance: The bed regularly requires pulling of weeds to remove annual cheat grass, rabbitbrush seedlings, and other perennial weeds. Bind weed can be controlled with bind weed mites purchased from the Tri-River Extension office. It is best to cut back the Russian Sage’s and buddleia’s to 3 and 6 inches, respectively, each spring as the plants bloom best off first-year growth and reduce crowding of the crown. At a minimum, pruning of these plants is recommended every 2-3 years. The crabapples require pruning to remove water suckers within the tree and at the base of the plant. Pruning can be performed in February or after they have finished flowering. Crown gall has been observed in all of these trees and it is anticipated to shorten their life. The roses require an application of fertilizer and aphid control product.  Dcon, or a similar product, sprinkled around the base of the junipers in the fall helps control vole (Meadow Mouse) damage. The junipers also require pruning when they creep into the sidewalk.


    2.   THE PARK (located on the east side of Saddle Court)

Description: The park is planted with Kentucky Bluegrass and includes several ornamental plum trees and ash trees. The zeric bed contains buddleia, crabapples, Russian Sage, Korean Lilacs, roses, and rabbitbrush. Several volunteer Cottonwood seedlings are growing at the back of the park. Hardscape includes a concrete walk and mail boxes.

Irrigation: The irrigation valves are located in the zeric bed near the mail boxes. The computer is located on private property at 414 Saddle Court. The computer is programmed to water ½ hour, twice a week. Note that over-watering of zeric beds is more likely to kill these plantings than under-watering.

Maintenance: Maple Leaf Landscaping & Maintenance has been contracted to apply fertilizer, pest, and weed control to the lawn area and mow the park weekly.  They also maintain the irrigation system.  The zeric bed regularly requires pulling of weeds to remove annual cheat grass, volunteer Rabbitbrush, and other perennial weeds. It is best to cut back the Russian Sage’s and Buddleia’s to 3 and 6 inches, respectively, each spring as the plants bloom best off first-year growth and reduce crowding of the crown. At a minimum, pruning of these plants is recommended every 2-3 years. The crabapples and plums require pruning to remove water sprouts from within the tree and at the base.


3.   THE SIGN BED (located at the intersection of Rana Road and Saddle Court)

Description: This bed consists of Russian Sage, Rabbitbrush, Pinyon Pine, Mountain Mahogany, Yucca, Nepeta, and Columbine . . . The sign for the Cobblestone Ridges development and a couple of large transformers are also located in this bed. A 2-ft unimproved strip of land, now owned by Mike Stubbs, lies between the bed and the adjacent house.

Irrigation: The valve box for the scrubber values is located in the unimproved strip (not HOA property). The computer controlling irrigation in this zone is located at the mail boxes on Rana Road. An additional cut-off valve is located on private property at 407 Saddle Court. A multi-purpose easement provides the legal right for this valve box to be on the property. Only one zone of the five? The computer is programmed to water 30 minutes, twice a week. Note that over-watering of zeric beds is more likely to kill these plantings than under-watering.

Maintenance: The bed regularly requires pulling of weeds to remove annual cheat grass, rabbitbrush seedlings, and other perennial weeds. Weed control in the unimproved strip is the responsibility of the City of Grand Junction; typically a phone call to the city is required when the weeds get too high. The Mountain Mahogany can be pruned into a hedge; however, this conflicts with the natural look of the bed. The Rabbitbrush may require selective pruning as it covers the sign.

The Pinyon trees in this bed have shown signs of Ips beetle. Dead/dying areas of the trees have been pruned and removed. Insecticides used to prevent Ips include either permethrin or carbaryl (Sevin) as the active ingredient and need to be applied when temperatures hit 55-60°F. Two applications are recommended in early spring and summer. There are many products currently on the market containing these active ingredients. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendation for the proper rate for bark beetle treatment. Bark beetle applications at the labeled rate should provide at least three months control of Ips beetles.

When a preventively-sprayed tree later dies of beetle attack, it is usually for one of the following reasons: 1) the tree was sprayed after it was attacked; 2) the spray was applied at too diluted a rate; 3) the entire bark surface of the susceptible part of the tree was not sprayed; or 4) the material wore off and was no longer effective.

Note: Concentrations of insecticides used to control bark beetles are often considerably greater than those used for insects on foliage. To avoid needle burning, try to limit the application to the bark, particularly when using liquid (emulsifiable concentrate) formulations that have increased risk of causing plant injuries.

Due to the current ips beetle infestation in Colorado, should these trees die, it is not recommended the bed be re-planted with Pinyon Pine. Austrian Pine may be another good choice.


4.   BUTTE BED (located at the intersection of Rana Road and Butte Court)

Description: This bed consists of Russian Sage, Apache Plume, Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans), Pinyon Pine, . . . A sidewalk runs at the back of the bed and an additional 2- to 3-ft strip of unimproved land lies adjacent to the walk which is the responsibility of the Cobblestone Ridge homeowners.

Irrigation: The irrigation valves and computer controlling water to this area are located in the unimproved strip. Only one zone of the five? Available on the computer is programmed for this bed. The computer is programmed to water ½ hour, twice a week. Note that over-watering of zeric beds is more likely to kill these plantings than under-watering.

Maintenance: The bed regularly requires pulling of weeds to remove annual cheat grass and other perennial weeds. Weeds in the unimproved strip are controlled by weekly mowing during the summer. The Rudbeckia is cut back to the ground each spring to keep the bed looking neat. It is best to cut back the Russian Sage’s to 3 inches each spring as the plants bloom best off first-year growth and reduce crowding of the crown. At a minimum, pruning of these plants is recommended every 2-3 years.


IRRIGATION WATER

Ridges Irrigation, controlled by the City of Grand Junction, is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the irrigation system in the Ridges development area and the Redlands Mesa 18 hole golf course with pressurized irrigation water.  The City of Grand Junction performs the billing at a rate of $12.00/month for single family units.  The HOA annual assessment only covers irrigation for the common areas; homeowners are responsible for irrigation fees for their property.

Irrigation water for the Ridges is targeted to be turned on April 1st and turned off November 1st each year.  In the event of a water break of a main irrigation line, contact a board member, or if not available, Ron Key, City of Grand Junction, at 244-1572.  Homeowners are responsible for repair of line breaks to their personal irrigation system; the HOA is responsible for irrigation repairs in the common areas and HOA-owned irrigation systems on private property, unless the break was caused by the homeowner.  The City has stated they are happy to help homeowners determine the source of the break, if needed.